British Museum: More than 1,000 Artefacts were Stolen

The British Museum has reported the theft of almost 1,000 Artefacts from its collection. This brazen act of criminality has not only compromised the museum’s legacy but has also raised serious concerns about the security measures in place to safeguard such priceless treasures.

The heist, supposedly including a senior curator, has featured critical holes in the museum’s inventory administration and security protocols, leaving questions unanswered about the extent of the loss and the future of the stolen artifacts.

British Museum: More than 1,000 Artefacts were Stolen

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Established in 1753 and opened to general society in 1759, the British Museum stands as a testament to human history, art, and culture. With a stunning collection of millions of valuable objects, it has captured the imaginations of countless visitors over the centuries.

The museum’s dedication to housing artifacts that span from the 15th century BC to the 19th century AD makes it a treasure trove of historical significance.

The museum hall’s serenity was broken when reports arose about the theft of almost 2,000 antiquities. The taken things, going from gold adornments to pearls of semi-precious stones, are assessed to be worth millions of pounds.

This incident, unparalleled in the museum’s history, has raised questions about the security measures in place to safeguard such irreplaceable treasures.

The theft became exposed when Director Hartwig Fischer recognized the claims in 2021 and quickly started an examination. It was uncovered that the stolen items were not out there for anyone to see but rather were kept in a storeroom assigned for research purposes.

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Shockingly, it is believed that these artifacts had been disappearing for years, with some even surfacing on online marketplaces like eBay as far back as 2016.

At the center of this debate is senior curator Peter Higgs, a figure regarded for his mastery in Greek collections, Greek sculpture, and the Hellenistic period.

Allegations suggest that Higgs, over a span of several years, removed items from the collection without detection and sold them on eBay for a fraction of their estimated value. The extent of his alleged involvement is staggering, with some reports hinting at more than 1,500 stolen artifacts attributed to him.

The British Museum’s senior leadership, including Director Hartwig Fischer, is under a magnifying glass for their treatment of the circumstance.

The size of the misfortune, which probably surpasses 1,000 items, has touched off requests for responsibility and raised worries about the museum’s security protocols. The alleged negligence in preserving and cataloging these artifacts has tarnished the institution’s reputation.

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The heist’s unraveling can be attributed to a user’s discovery of curator Peter Higgs’ PayPal account linked to his Twitter profile.

This disclosure uncovered Higgs’ real name and his situation at the museum. This breakthrough led to the identification of items that had been properly cataloged, allowing them to be traced back to the inventory.

The monetary effect of the theft is faltering, with with estimates placing the value of the stolen artifacts in the tens of millions of pounds. These priceless relics, some dating back 3,500 years, hold both historical and monetary significance, further emphasizing the gravity of the incident.

The British Museum has taken legal action against Peter Higgs and is cooperating with the Metropolitan Police’s Economic Crime Command to address the situation.

The institution’s announcement of an independent review to reassess its security protocols is seen as a crucial step in preventing such incidents in the future.

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